Herbs: More Than Lovely Fragrances and Good Tastes Have you ever wondered why a plant is considered to be an herb, where it originated, how it got its name, what it can be used for, and why it is cherished in the garden? Plants are defined as herbs based on how they are valued. Many have wonderful fragrances and many are used in a culinary way. However, other qualities put them in this category as well: medicinal merits, pesticidal properties, and/or their use as a dye. The members of the Dirty Hands Herb Garden Project team have been researching the history, folklore, uses, and cultural information for many of the fascinating plants growing in our garden located on the campus of Reynolds Community College in Goochland. To explore the information that we’ve discovered, click on the links below:
Take Care When Using Herbs Herbs, many of them ancient, have been enjoyed through the ages in both food and beverages. They were and still are used as a remedy for all sorts of ailments and complaints. Even though there are many herbs considered natural and safe, there are those that can cause health issues especially for sensitive individuals, pregnant women, and children. Just because they may have been used in the past, does not mean they are safe today. Some are not safe if used in large amounts, and there are others that are downright dangerous. It is always prudent to thoroughly research an herb before using it and avoid self-diagnosis and self medication.

Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, United States; M. Ray McKinnie, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg, VA, United States.